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I Invested In Facebook, Twitter, AMD, And Snap, Made 6.3X—And I Absolutely Hated It

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Writer’s note: So here’s the background. This following post originally appeared on my Biggerpockets.com column. 

Now peep this. I buy and manage real estate for a living. Naturally I’m biased in favor of that asset class, namely because of the lower volatility. As an extension of that bias, I wrote this piece a few months to illustrate why I prefer stock…well, less. 

I saw the stock markets were down. I really didn’t want to buy. But I had to. As Neil Patel told me, “You make money on the buy.” Sure enough, my holdings damn near doubled in a matter of months.

Months after that, Snap’s gone into the toilet, BlackBerry’s on some f*ck sh*t, AMD stopped surging and it’s right back to where I started—HIGHLIGHTING exactly why stocks (from a short-term investor perspective) is something I really don’t love.

Here’s what I wrote April 30 of this year.

***

I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again: I do not like stocks. I really don’t. Granted, for a new investor, it’s a great, free way to get in the asset column with very little money.

And there are many public securities — especially real estate-backed ones — that help you build wealth. But on a macro level, I absolutely hate it.

So, a few weeks ago, the stock market tanked — based on trade tension speculation (or something).

I was looking at the Robinhood dashboard, which shows how the stocks are trending. Everything was red! And you know what they say, when there’s blood in the streets, you buy — right?

So I picked up a couple of common-sense stocks based on what people are using; Twitter, Snapchat, Facebook, you know, the tech blue-chippers.

Then some Blackberry ones based on driverless technology they have, and a VR/AI stock with a big market share. (Writer’s note: This was AMD, the hottest stock of the year. Which since has gotten crushed. Shows how smart I was.) Gotta invest in the future, right?

Long story short, the very next trading day I was up 10%. I kept looking every day, more and more disgusted with the volatile nature of these equities — in spite of how I was winning! Less than three weeks later, I am now up a ridiculously disgusting 630% annualized.

And as of today, stocks dropped again. Just based on some speculation about oil. (Or something.) So I’m probably about to make another score when it inevitably re-stabilizes. And it’s absolutely filthy.

Here’s My Problem With Stocks…

Like many business owners, I hate surprises. I don’t even want anyone to throw me a surprise party. And stocks are full of surprises.

I actually did an interview last year explaining why I think real estate investments crush stocks all day.

Bold Biz: Philip Michael

Philip Michael has experience in media, journalism, real estate, entrepreneurship, and more… He shared his experience with #BoldBiz

Posted by BoldTV on Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Now, because of rules, you’ll have to click here to read the rest here. Or hit me on IG and we can get the conversation started.

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Video: Compound Interest, Explained

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A UPS worker never made more than $14,000 a year but retired with $70 million. How? Compound interest. Here’s how it works, courtesy of Investopedia.

 

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3 Ways To Invest From Your Smartphone For Under $5

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The numbers say 80% of millennials don’t invest in stocks.

Reason? Half say they don’t have money, one-third says it’s too early and another third says they don’t know how.

In addition to that, there’s demographic gap. “The average age of a financial advisor is 55,” said Douglas Boneparth, a New York City-based financial planner. “There are more financial advisors over the age of 70 than there are under 30.”

Despite these beliefs, you don’t really need much money, nor experience, to get started. (Just look at our fearless co-founder Odunayo Eweniyi and what she’s pulled off here)

Be that as it may, here are three ways to get started for $5 or less.

1. Stash

Image result for stash app

What: A micro-investment app (iOS and Android) with over 30 ETFs according to industry, sector and risk tolerance.

How it works: Download the app and choose your investment.

Minimum investment: $5

Cost: Fees range from $1 a month for accounts under $5,000 to 0.25% a year.

“We help people who don’t have a lot save money on a weekly basis,” CEO and co-founder Brandon Krieg said in one interview. “Stashers look like America, they look like people you meet every day: they are nurses and teachers and Uber and Lyft drivers.”

2. Acorns

 

What: iOS and Android app.

How it works: Download the app and choose one of six index funds. When you buy, say a cup of coffee for $1.75, it rounds up the change to $2 and deposits the difference.

Minimum investment: $5

Cost: Just like Stash, fees range from $1 a month for accounts under $5,000 to 0.25% a year.

“We’re not trying to preach austerity to the client, because that’s a bummer,” CMO Manning Field says. “Some people will say, ‘Don’t have the cup of coffee.’ We’ll tell you to have the cup of coffee and invest along the way.”

3. Robinhood

What: A commission-free investment app (iOS and Android).

How it works: Download and start buying stocks.

Minimum investment: Whatever stock you want to buy.

Cost: Free.

And by the way, if you want to get a fast start on real estate, here’s Forbes’ list of nine REITs with yields between 8% and 10%.

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CHART: How Blockchain Powers Bitcoin

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Blockchain, Bitcoin. Bitcoin, blockchain.

The two terms go hand in hand—and have become almost ubiquitous with this year’s insane rise (and fall) of Bitcoin.

But what does it all really mean? How does it come together? In this week’s chart, our friends at CB Insights break down exactly how blockchain powers Bitcoin.

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