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These 5 Small Cap Stocks Lost Over $17M Last Week

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Small-cap stocks are generally an ideal investment for investors which a high-risk appetite. Small-cap stocks have a market capitalization of under $3B.

These companies provide a higher rate of return as they are generally driven by high growth prospects. These shares are also more volatile compared to mid-cap or large-cap stocks.

The Vanguard Small Cap ETF [VB] which is a broad indicator of the small-cap space,  declined over 3.3% last week. Here we look at small-cap stocks that underperformed the market significantly in the first month of Oct. 2018.

GoPro

GoPro [GPRO] shares fell 13% last week to close trading at $6.26. The stock has burnt significant investor wealth over the last two years due to a decline in product shipments.

GoPro launched the highly anticipated Karma drone two years back but had to recall shipments shortly after the product launch. The company then decided to discontinue the production of Karma and exited the drone market.

Earlier this year, GoPro has launched several products across price points to target different customer segments. It will be interesting to see if this will improve device sales and result in revenue growth for the company.

Market Cap: $931.5M

Year-to-date Return: -17.3%

Last week decline: $139M

Windstream

This telecom company has had a horrendous run in the last two years. Windstream [WIN] shares have declined 51% this year after slumping 76% in 2017. The stock declined 8.2% last week.

Some analysts believe the rising debt levels of Windstream might drive the firm to bankruptcy. Earlier this year, Michael Rollins from Citigroup [C], reduced Windstream’s price target to $1.

According to Rollins, Windstream is in a “precarious operating position and faces rising financial risks.

Market Cap: $193.2M

Year-to-date Return: -51.35%

Last week decline: $17M

Frontier Corp.

Similar to Windstream [WIN], Frontier Corp. [FTR] continues to underperform the markets significantly. The stock is up marginally by 0.7% this year. It has however declined 22% in 2016 and 87% last year. Shares fell 5% last week.

The company has been impacted severely by subscriber losses and falling profitability. FTR purchased Verizon’s [VZ] CTF (California, Texas and Florida) assets for $10.54B way back in 2016.

Though this initially resulted in cost savings, the cord-cutting phenomenon coupled with the demand for a cable-based internet impacted the company’s revenue.

FTR has to discontinue its dividend payouts and impose a reverse stock split to continue trading on NASDAQ.

Market Cap: $720.57M

Year-to-date Return: -0.74%

Last week decline: $37M

Pandora

Shares of music streaming company, Pandora [P] declined close to 6% last week. In the last week of Sept., the stock rose 4.6% as Sirius XM [SIRI] announced its intention to acquire Pandora for $3.5B.

Pandora shares have had an impressive run in 2018, as the stock has risen close to 86%.

Market Cap: $2.41B

Year-to-date Return: 86%

Last week decline: $140M

Fitbit

Fitbit [FIT] too has burnt significant investor wealth in the last two years. This stock fell 73% in 2016 and 25% in 2017. Shares have slipped close to 12% in 2018 as well.

Fitbit shares were recently impacted by the launch of the Apple Watch Series 4. The company’s shares have declined driven by Fitbit’s loss in the wearable market. Fitbit shipments have fallen in a growing wearable space.

The company has struggled to compete against Apple [AAPL], Garmin [GRMN], Xiaomi and Fossil [FOSL].

Market Cap: $1.24B

Year-to-date Return: -12%

Last week decline: $70M

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CNBC: Here’s Why WeWork Wants To Go Public

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News broke recently that WeWork’s going public in September. In this video, CNBC breaks down why they’re going public.

Before you watch, though, here’s some context.

WeWork’s recent S-1 filing — the paperwork you file with the SEC right before you go public — had the entire internet up in arms, including ourselves, trying to decode how the heck WeWork justifies its insane valuation.

Related: Inside WeWork’s $20B Valuation: Is It Really Worth It?

Considering, ya know, IWG, a direct competitor, has nearly double the revenue, five times the members, is $2.5B ahead on the bottom line and…well, you can sort of see where this is going.

Despite earning an insane $47B valuation this year, it’s bleeding dough. Yes, WeWork grossed $1.8B in 2018…but it also lost $1.9B.

Be that as it may, WeWork is going public this year (via parent company “The We Company”), the latest in a string of high-profile tech IPOs in 2019.

And speaking of tech. Despite numerous “tech” mentions in the S-1, critics are claiming WeWork is little more than a real estate company.

As far as the We losses go, CFO Artie Minson told CNBC that investors need not worry about those grim financials, but instead to look at WeWork’s losses as “investments” that will lead to greater cash flow. (Which is very possible.)

And even if short-term losses eventually unearth long-term cash flows, will they be enough to justify its lofty valuation…and even loftier ambitions?

While we’re waiting for time to tell on WeWork’s future, if you’re looking to raise your startup game right now, go check out our content partner More Labs’ brand-new drink Aqua+. (Yes, the same More Labs behind this drink that broke the internet.) 

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Video: Compound Interest, Explained

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A UPS worker never made more than $14,000 a year but retired with $70 million. How? Compound interest. Here’s how it works, courtesy of Investopedia.

 

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3 Ways To Invest From Your Smartphone For Under $5

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The numbers say 80% of millennials don’t invest in stocks.

Reason? Half say they don’t have money, one-third says it’s too early and another third says they don’t know how.

In addition to that, there’s demographic gap. “The average age of a financial advisor is 55,” said Douglas Boneparth, a New York City-based financial planner. “There are more financial advisors over the age of 70 than there are under 30.”

Despite these beliefs, you don’t really need much money, nor experience, to get started. (Just look at our fearless co-founder Odunayo Eweniyi and what she’s pulled off here)

Be that as it may, here are three ways to get started for $5 or less.

1. Stash

Image result for stash app

What: A micro-investment app (iOS and Android) with over 30 ETFs according to industry, sector and risk tolerance.

How it works: Download the app and choose your investment.

Minimum investment: $5

Cost: Fees range from $1 a month for accounts under $5,000 to 0.25% a year.

“We help people who don’t have a lot save money on a weekly basis,” CEO and co-founder Brandon Krieg said in one interview. “Stashers look like America, they look like people you meet every day: they are nurses and teachers and Uber and Lyft drivers.”

2. Acorns

 

What: iOS and Android app.

How it works: Download the app and choose one of six index funds. When you buy, say a cup of coffee for $1.75, it rounds up the change to $2 and deposits the difference.

Minimum investment: $5

Cost: Just like Stash, fees range from $1 a month for accounts under $5,000 to 0.25% a year.

“We’re not trying to preach austerity to the client, because that’s a bummer,” CMO Manning Field says. “Some people will say, ‘Don’t have the cup of coffee.’ We’ll tell you to have the cup of coffee and invest along the way.”

3. Robinhood

What: A commission-free investment app (iOS and Android).

How it works: Download and start buying stocks.

Minimum investment: Whatever stock you want to buy.

Cost: Free.

And by the way, if you want to get a fast start on real estate, here’s Forbes’ list of nine REITs with yields between 8% and 10%.

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