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VIDEO: Gary Vee’s ‘Breakthrough’: How You Can Make $100k This Year

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Wanna make a hundred grand? Heck yeah, who doesn’t?!

Gary Vaynerchuk said he discovered a breakthrough strategy to never be broke. “I think I just eliminated for the first time in my career the excuse of no money,” he said.

But how do you take it a step further? Here’s Gary Vee’s take on how you can take this strategy to make a $100k this year.

Wealth Hacks

5 Ways To Turn If Your College Major Does Not Match Your Passion

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(Editor’s Note: The following article is a guest post by superstar entrepreneur and tech investor Jonathan Schultz.)

Having a degree matters…but maybe not the specific degree you have. Why? Well, according to recent research by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, 62% of recent college graduates are working in jobs that require a degree, but only 27% of college graduates are working in a job that even relates to their major. Here are tips on how to pivot if your college major doesn’t match your motivation or passion.

1. REMEMBER, YOUR FIRST JOB MAY NOT ALIGN WITH YOUR MAJOR

Jobs in today’s world do not always fit what your college major may be. This is why it is important to have a minor that may not be something you love but is something that can come in handy in the workforce. Perhaps you could minor in computer engineering or coding even if you major in fashion media. You would be surprised at how these two separate studies could cross paths.

2. YOUR EXPERIENCE IS WHAT REALLY MATTERS

Take advantage of opportunities to intern in various different companies and in different types of jobs. Get involved on campus and volunteer for things you care about. Those items may get you excited about something that you otherwise didn’t study in school, which could bring you into a whole new direction.

3. FOCUS ON SOFT SKILLS

Employers want to see that you can learn fast, fit into the environment and be responsive to each task that is assigned. Ninety-three percent of employers believe that critical thinking, communication, and problem-solving skills are more vital than someone’s undergraduate field of study. Even Silicon Valley is starting to favor employees who studied liberal arts as those opposed to the typical technology path. Soft skills are a huge deal to employers. It’s great to create a product —but if you can’t get someone else to believe in it, then it will end up as just a great idea.

4. YOUR NETWORK IS PARAMOUNT

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You know what they say… “it isn’t about what you know, but WHO you know.” You can choose a business major with the target of becoming a CEO one day, but the truth of the matter is that if you don’t create a network, you’re limiting the speed of getting where you want to go. You can start building your network now by building relationships with your professors and peers and attending as many networking events as possible.

The major you choose is not the only path your career will take you on. You may end up with all A’s in finance but end up becoming a graphic designer. The choice is yours and it will be the right one as long as you are excited and find what motivates you to wake up every day and push forward.

Jonathan Schultz is an entrepreneur, real estate tech investor and influencer. He’s the co-founder of Onyx Equities, a leading private equity real estate firm, and has been voted one of the most powerful people in real estate. Follow Jon’s blog here

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Wealth Hacks

The Guide Through Every Stage Of Life Using Investment Vehicles

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The moment you enter the workforce and start making money, you should already start thinking about where and how to maximize your investment vehicles. Whether you’re a freelancer, a full-time employee, or a business owner, making your first investment can bring you closer to your financial goals.

There are many investment vehicles to choose from, such as stock and bonds, real estate, VUL insurance, mutual funds, and many others. For a lot of people, creating an effective investment strategy can be overwhelming. Some want quick returns and forget that there’s a lifetime ahead of them to make their investments and other resources work for them, while others are content with having bank accounts that earn little to no profit.

But when it comes to investments, it’s not about which one you should put your money in – it’s about which investment vehicles are right for your individual financial situation and goals.

Before Investing: Factors to Consider

The key to becoming a smart investor is to match your resources, requirements, and priorities in relation to a particular period or stage in your life. This means your investment decisions will have to be based on several factors, including your monthly income, assets, expenses, financial goals, and risk appetite for investment, among others.

Since investing can take a considerable chunk of your finances, you need to check your cash flow. Do you have a regular office job or a flourishing business that gives you a stable source of income? With the income you’re getting, are you still left with surplus cash that you can use toward investing? It’s important to ask these questions as these allow you to set proper expectations about your financial responsibility as an investor.

It’s also advisable for you to take stock of your financial position for the short term. Ideally, you should have saved six months’ worth of salary to help you minimize the impact for when your ability to earn – and consequently, invest – is affected by economic factors or personal emergencies. It simply isn’t wise to go into investments when you’re struggling with your finances, especially when there’s no real guarantee that your return on investment (ROI) is going to be quick. The idea in investing is to part with money, which you can afford not to use or spend for months or years.

Your readiness to invest may also depend on how much you’re paying your billers to cover for your monthly expenses, such as housing, education, transportation, food or groceries, and the like. Aside from these, you have to factor in your lifestyle and personal expenses, too. If you’re spending more than what you’re earning, it’s a red flag indicating that you don’t have a healthy financial status and may not be ready to invest.

Here’s a sample of the recommended expense-to-income ratio for various types of expenses:

Housing: 20% to 25% of your income

Transportation: 15% to 25% of your income

Living Allowance: 20% to 25 of your income

Debt Payments: 5% to 10% of your income

Savings: 10% to 15% of your income

When it comes to your financial goals, you can tap on your investments to help you reach those objectives. If you’re a new parent, some of your high-priority goals may be to buy a house, establish your child’s educational fund, and make sure you have readily-available cash in your bank account.

In this case, you’d do well to put your assets in different investment vehicles. Doing so helps you manage the risks that come with investing, and as a result, gives you more chances of achieving your goals as the money you invested starts growing.

Speaking of risks, it’s another factor you need to consider when you decide to invest. Since almost all forms of investment come with a risk, you need to determine if you’re open to the prospect of having your investments depreciate at some point in time. This is known as your risk appetite. If you’re not too comfortable with the thought of incurring possible losses, then you’ll have to be conservative in investing. Consider investments with lesser risk.

Your timeframe for investment vehicles may also influence how much risk you’re willing to take. Generally speaking, your risk appetite decreases as you age. If you start building your investment portfolio while you’re in your 20s, you can have more time to recover any money you might lose than if you choose to invest when you’re already nearing retirement.

Which investment vehicles Should You Invest In?

Once you’ve assessed the various factors described above, the next step is choosing the right investment vehicle. This is one of the biggest dilemmas that investors tackle, especially if you’re barely getting started. You might find the decision process easier if you first line up your goals, and from there, make a comparison of what investment vehicles might be suitable for your timeline.

It’s likely that you’ll be coming up with short-, medium-, and long-term goals. Naturally, each of these will require investments that are aligned with yet a different set of factors, such as interest rates, liquidity period, and overall value for your hard-earned money.

For short-term goals, the most common types of investment may include fixed deposit, liquid funds, or short-term debt funds. Meanwhile, you may opt for balanced funds and equity-linked savings schemes for your medium-term goals. Obviously, your long-term goals will give you the widest range of options, from stocks and bonds to real estate.

Indeed, investing your hard-earned dollars is a major venture that requires a lot of homework, careful planning, making projections, weighing your options, and so on, to grow your money over time. In our featured infographic, we discuss more of the things you need to consider, so you can have a clearer perspective about investing at whatever life stage you may be.

Investment Guide Through Every Stage of Life

Investment Guide Through Every Stage of Life

Investment Guide Through Every Stage of Life

Investment Guide Through Every Stage of Life

Investment Guide Through Every Stage of Life

Investment Guide Through Every Stage of Life

Investment Guide Through Every Stage of Life

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Investing In Stock Using Warren Buffett’s Mindset: Coca Cola Story

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Warren Buffett‘s Stock Market Investing Mindset is one we can learn so much from. I use Buffett’s Coca Cola story to give a few examples on investing patience and knowledge.

Transcript

Good day fellow investors. A few days ago we discussed compounding as one of the most powerful forces when it comes to investing as with Buffett say just let the earnings the interest dividends compound and you will do extremely well today. I want to continue on this Buffett mindset investing mentality. Buffett’s investing mindset by discussing patience and discipline and discussing the whole example of Buffett and his ventures with Coca-Cola in a future video I’ll discuss. I have already prepared 15 to 20 Buffett’s mistakes so be sure to subscribe to get the whole complete. Buffett’s investing mindset series. And what’s that. Because it’s all about mindset. It’s all about character right.

And what do you consider the most important quality for an investment manager. It’s a temperamental quality not an intellectual quality. You don’t need tons of IQ in this business.

I mean you have to have enough IQ to get from here to downtown Omaha. But what you do not have to be able to play three dimensional chess or be in the top leagues in terms of Bridgepoint or something of a sort. You need a stable personality you need a temperament that neither derives great pleasure from being with the crowd or against the crowd because this is not a business where you take polls it’s a business where you think. And Ben Graham would say that you’re not right or wrong because a thousand people agree with you and you’re not right or wrong because a thousand people disagree with you you’re right because your facts and your reasoning are right.

Now let’s talk about this character by discussing the story of Buffett and Coca-Cola. This story is very intriguing and interesting because the story of Buffett and Coca-Cola started when he was 7 years old. But why is unclear. Buffett told the story again. Picture Omaha in 1937 I was 7 years old and.

No air conditioning so the summers were hot and humid. People went out on their lawns at night just to try and cool off and I got the idea that maybe I could sell them what you would call soft drinks and we called Pop. So I went round to a bunch of gas stations and in those days every gas station had a cooler. With very soft drinks. And it had a little open around the side and something to catch all the bottle caps. So I went around and collected all the bottle caps for weeks these various gas stations I like to eight thousand of them. And then I sort of them all out. And I saw that there were Coca-Cola overwhelmed everybody else. So I decided to hook myself up to them. And. There were these little silver like ones that in those days and my grandfather at a grocery store so I went to my grandfather and I said. How about giving me a deal on coke so I can sell around the neighborhood. And he saw me at the rate of six bottles for a quarter and I went around and sold it for a nickel each and I sold out every time. And I had no inventory I had no receivables. I had the best business I ever had.

But I made one mistake and I didn’t put the money I saved in the Coca-Cola stock.

But I rectified that mistake some years later.

So that some years later is exactly 50 years later. Buffett waited for 50 years to buy a company. He always liked and why Buffett didn’t buy earlier is a very important question. But this the answer shows the discipline and the patience. Buffett had to watch something for 50 years and not watch it but then buy big. More about the story about Coca-Cola and everything else. Buffett has been doing. You can read in The Snowball, Warren Buffett’s biography out autobiography biography almost.

This article originally appeared on ValueWalk. Follow ValueWalk on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.

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